Vertical Metal-Cutting Band Saws

JZH

VFR Club Bodger
#21
...like this one:
Startrite 14-T-10 in Hertfordshire-1.jpg
Startrite 14-T-10 in Hertfordshire-3.jpg
Now I have to sell a 14-S-5! :eeek:

I wasn't kidding. I've been looking for Startrite bandsaws for over a year, and I'd never even seen a 14-T-10 for sale. Then two come along at once! (There's still another one available in Reading on Gumtree, asking £445.) This saw is exactly the same as my other one, but for a couple of important differences: First, it has a two-speed reduction gearbox, which, when combined with the same five-groove pulley system as the other saw, results in 10 speeds rather than five. Second (this is the significance of the "T" versus the "S"), it has a half-speed motor, so its fastest speed is half that of my other saw--perfect for metals. Otherwise, the saws are essentially the same (the other one was re-sprayed blue at some point in its hard life). This one looks hardly used, and as luck had it, I paid about the same for this one as the other one.

I think I'll sell the blue one with the inverter I just bought and with the motor re-configured for 220v, so I can advertise it as running on 220v single-phase. The three-phase thing seems to be a big deal-breaker for many people (many of these saws get zero bids for weeks and weeks on eBay), so if I can sell it in usable, running condition I think I'll make most of my money back. I have no room for two monster bandsaws, so go it must...

The other reasons why I would be happy to sell the inverter are: (1) this particular 14-T-10 has an accessory blade welder/grinder unit, which certainly only runs on 440v, so I'd need a 220v IN, 440V OUT inverter if I wanted to be able to use it (most inverters cannot step up the input voltage, but a few expensive ones do), and (2) because I don't need to reduce the motor speed electronically anymore, I don't really need an inverter at all. I could use a "static converter" instead, which essentially provides a 440v 3-phase Lewden-type outlet in a 220v 1-phase shop, which the saw is simply plugged into. OTOH, I don't really need the blade welder, so I can just sell it and use a cheaper 220v inverter after all?

Anyway, time to organise another tail-lift van... :cool:

Ciao,
 

PAD

Registered User
Site Sponsor
#22
Well... After my initial :confused:, I thought much along your lines of being able to sell the 'inverted' saw without much loss. Maybe even a small profit? The replacement sounds ideal. I wouldn't bother with blade welding personally. I've never used a repaired blade, or one made up from a coil of new stock, that didn't have at best a slightly uneven join (occasionally a nasty, thumping horror, even though the joint looked OK). New blades aren't vastly expensive anyway (or weren't, at least).

Just watch the back on moving the darned things again!
 

JZH

VFR Club Bodger
#23
Got lucky again; the seller's happy to deliver it to me for less than a hire van would have cost me (which also eliminates most of the machine-wrangling risks that go with it). I'm with you on the blade welder. I'm sure it makes sense for shops doing a lot of cutting to buy bulk blade material, but I'm happy to just buy a new blade when I need one (and the blades seem to be commonly available in all TPIs).

I do now have to get the old saw running--I hope it actually runs!

Ciao,
 

JZH

VFR Club Bodger
#26
Me, too. Of course, it also means that if I had only been patient for another month, I would have avoided most of the hassle I've now created for myself. Hindsight, etc...

Ciao,
 

JZH

VFR Club Bodger
#27
You can now officially call me "Johnny Two-Saws...but only has space for one"

20171115_155107y.jpg
The new one is sweeeet! Ex-college, looks hardly used, and it's full of sawdust. Why would you buy a slow-speed saw and then use it to cut wood?!? But, I'm glad they did!
The blade welder may or may not have been originally supplied with the saw. Most of the ones I've seen on other Startrite's are built-in, but it may be that the 14" models simply don't have the room for that.
20171115_145830y.jpg
It and the bracket were easily removed from the side of the saw (it's cast iron and weighs at least 25kg), and it's fitted with a 13A plug. It's labeled as a 220v unit, so should be easy to sell.
20171115_145846y.jpg
This is the engine room...Needs a new v-belt! The knob in the centre of the upper pulley engages the 1/10 speed gearbox. The motor is a 700rpm, 220/440v, 3-phase, 1.0hp Brook Motors unit. I was slightly surprised about that last bit--the motor on the other saw is 1.25hp, but I suppose with the gearing options the motor should be relatively undertaxed.

So, apologies, but this thread is not going to involve me retrofitting pulleys and jackshaft assemblies to vintage machinery after all!

Ciao,
 

JZH

VFR Club Bodger
#31
Hard to believe I've had a proper bandsaw for almost a year and still can't use it! Ah, well, life...

I've recently been working on getting it (and the rest of the garage) operational, and I'm finally to the point where I'm considering the inverter wiring. The instructions (it's a Hitachi X200) are "comprehensive" to the point of being almost incomprehensible to a non-electrical engineer, but I can read wiring diagrams and it is clear that the inverter is supposed to be isolated from the supply (220v) using a double-pole switch.

I hadn't noticed that this inverter doesn't have its own power switch. So, I think it will need a DP isolator. That's probably better (and more convenient) than using the inverter's RCBO as its power switch...

Ciao,

JZH
 

JZH

VFR Club Bodger
#33
Thanks, interesting. I'm using a digital inverter, so I won't be pulling capacitors from old battens, but it was very instructive about the motor wiring (which I will need to do, as the inverter is a 220v single phase input/220v three phase output model and the motor is 440v/220v three phase).

Power switch sorted...

20180920_142538x.jpg

The inverter is actually just sitting in the box on the left, yet to be permanently mounted in front of a second 80mm fan. Just waiting for some machined M5 standoffs to arrive (and I've yet to install the three-phase Gewiss socket for the bandsaw). The red rotary switch is overkill (32A) for the inverter, but eBay... The middle box switches between the welder and the compressor (so the latter can never switch itself on automatically during my F1-quality welding). And the 13A Clipsal socket is dedicated to the anti-frost heater (the thermostat will go in the middle section).

Ciao,

JZH
 
#34
That hole in the bottom if the CU is a code1 violation (requires immediate rectification) (Sir, I need you to reach for the gaffer tape around about now)

No I don’t agree it’s immediately dangerous either but thats the way the classify that, in that context.
 

JZH

VFR Club Bodger
#35
I don't know if you can see from the photo, but there's a solid rubber grommet in that hole. That could be replaced by a glued-in solid plastic disc, if necessary... But isn't the entire plastic CU a code violation these days? I thought I'd read that they had to be metal now.

Ciao,

JZH
 
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