Puncture repair kits,

Nitenurse

Registered User
Site Sponsor
#21
After watching numerous YouTube videos on repairing motorcycle punctures I decided to buy the 'Stop & Go' kit off EBay. Arrived this morning, now in my top box. The stop & go repair seemed to be the least 'messy' & easiest way of doing a roadside repair (IMO).
 

L2RKE

Z1000sx Tourer
Site Sponsor
#22
After watching numerous YouTube videos on repairing motorcycle punctures I decided to buy the 'Stop & Go' kit off EBay. Arrived this morning, now in my top box. The stop & go repair seemed to be the least 'messy' & easiest way of doing a roadside repair (IMO).
Very tempted with this kit but surprised it comes with no glue. Must be good;)
 

StisOwl

Registered User
#23
Santa gave me a Stop n Go kit for Christmas but it only came with 2 x 16g CO2 cartridges, I bought a box of 10 along with an adjustable valve adapter for £14. I've got a nick in my car tyre sidewall so needs replacing, I think I'll practice on that tyre by putting a screw in the middle of the tread before I have to use it on the bike.
 
Last edited:

StisOwl

Registered User
#25
Tried the Stop & Go kit on my car tyre (it was going to be changed today anyway), I drove in a No.8 screw, removed it, and set about the repair.
I may have overdone the reaming and made the hole a bit big (see later). If I need to use the kit again I will try the applicator with the bradawl spike as I use the reamer so I get a tighter fit, the rest was easy and there wasn't an air leak after I inflated the tyre.
I had a look at the repair when the tyre was off the rim and was pleased with the result, I managed to get my thumb nail under the plug and lever it out (hole too big ?) air pressure should have kept it in place but my trial run with the kit was worth it, maybe a run of rubber glue around the stem of the plug when pulling it up would have made it more secure.
 

L2RKE

Z1000sx Tourer
Site Sponsor
#26
I just tried Dynaplug, but it just made a slow puncture a fast puncture :rolleyes:
Turned out I had half a bleedin cocktail stick in me rear tyre.:(
 

Bonjo

Registered User
#27
Tried the Stop & Go kit on my car tyre (it was going to be changed today anyway), I drove in a No.8 screw, removed it, and set about the repair.
I may have overdone the reaming and made the hole a bit big (see later). If I need to use the kit again I will try the applicator with the bradawl spike as I use the reamer so I get a tighter fit, the rest was easy and there wasn't an air leak after I inflated the tyre.
I had a look at the repair when the tyre was off the rim and was pleased with the result, I managed to get my thumb nail under the plug and lever it out (hole too big ?) air pressure should have kept it in place but my trial run with the kit was worth it, maybe a run of rubber glue around the stem of the plug when pulling it up would have made it more secure.
nothing beat a dry run for experience before you have to do something in anger. It looks that mushroom repair kits are more favourable. They ceratinly have got my attention:)
 

StisOwl

Registered User
#28
As an update, last summer I used the Stop'N Go on the rear Road Pilot that came with the bike, it wasn't successful as it started to leak after a couple of days, I was going to change the tyres anyway as they were ancient. I went with Metzeler Roadtec Z8's and asked to keep the Michelin to practice repairs on, looking at the Michelin it wasn't surprising the plug didn't take as the inside of the tyre had a raised irregular pattern that would have made it very unlikely for the mushroom plug to get a good seal against the inside of the tyre.
This year I got a staple in the Z8 rear (am I unlucky ?) and put in a plug that has lasted 1300 miles so far, maybe the Metzeler has a smoother internal surface for the plug to grip, although I did add a bit of rubber glue to the sides of the plug.
 

count von count

Registered User
Site Sponsor
#30
I use Rema REP+AIR kits. Haven't had a puncture in ages now (touches wood) but used a few times and always worked well. Small enough to go under the pillion seat cowl on my VFR too.
 

PAD

Registered User
Site Sponsor
#31
Rema Rep+Air are what the RAC use, they're what I've used and they're what I stock. They work. Unlike some!
 

Red Leader

Registered User
#32
Stop and Go for me. Puncture in France, literally 5 mins or less to fix, then another 30 mins to find a petrol station with an airline to blow up to correct pressure. (Bought a mini compressor since then). Got me home no probs and no loss of air.
Trouble is, thinking of changing bikes to 800GS. It does have tubeless tyres but with tubes because of spokes! PITA and major sticking point!
 

Rizarc

VFR 750FR
Site Sponsor
#33
I thought the later GS's at least the 1100s are actually tubeless and don't require one since the way the spokes are actually fitted. They don't go through the wheels like "normal" pushbike style.
There are other options to add outex? or helicopter tape equivalent to make a spoked wheel tubeless.
May be something for you to look into.
 

oldrat

Guzzista and Ducatista
Staff member
Site Sponsor
#37
A word of warning about the co2 cylinders.
Try them out first.

In a safe environment (near an airline) deflate your tyre, and test your co2 cylinders, they can be quite fiddly and by the time you’ve sussed out getting the seal right you lose all compression as they empty really quickly.

First time around I got through five gas cylinders before the tyre was even half inflated!
 

PAD

Registered User
Site Sponsor
#38
Sage advice, Brian. You can buy an adapter that makes life easier in that regard. These are fitted to the tyre with its valve closed, then the CO2 cylinder is screwed into that and the valve opened, giving much more control. Crap photo, but this kind of thing.

Tyre Inflator Valve.jpg
 

BikerBarry

Registered User
#39
When touring I carry "Stop & Go" tyre plugger together with Airman Tour compressor.

The compressor is very compact and hardly takes up any room in my luggage. So far I've been lucky and have only used the compressor at home to top-up pressures. Only use with crocodile clips direct to the battery and engine running.

Airman Tour.JPG
 

PAD

Registered User
Site Sponsor
#40
I've never so much as seen an Airman 'in the flesh' let alone used one, but they have a good reputation. I only posted the photo of the Rocky Creek type as an example - while they are about as compact as it gets, they have the disadvantage of getting VERY hot, with no shielding - not one to pack away until fully cooled down and well capable of inflicting a nasty burn. A similar level of compactness can be achieved for very little by stripping the casings off a cheap as chips mini compressor,

Tyre cheap mini compressor.jpg
but the same applies with these regarding heat and, while they might get you out of trouble as they are very widely available, they tend to be, well... a bit shit, really.

The price of the Airman has plummeted over the last year or so - it has to be worth considering.
 
Top