Picking up a dropped VFR !!!

#1
So I watched all the youtubers picking cup a motorcycle, you lay it down lock the front wheel steering fully on, try to get it into gear to prevent the rear wheel moving , put the side stand down, if its fallen the right way, and then you just squat down with your ass against the seat and push backwards whilst holding a handlebar and somewhere in the rear and Voila your up. NO! I dropped my 1998 800i a few weeks ago and there was no way it was ever going to get up, I am 5 ,11 and have strong thighs after decades cycling and it was just not going to ever get up, has anyone got any suggestions? And not get stronger Mr Weedy, please :)
 

FTM

Registered User
#2
Get younger, you lose about 10% of your strength every 10 years from the age of 30. I'm 60 now and I've noticed recently that stuff I picked up easily in my 30's and 40's I struggle with now. Just yesterday I had to get help to carry a kitchen worktop, something I did on my own for years previously.
 
#3
I dropped mine without crash bungs and it was a full on power lift drive from the floor, with good form.

Add a few years and a heart attack and general lack of physical condition and I dropped it again.
And I’m like 'oh fluck, here we go...I wonder how this is going to pan out?'

But this time I had crash bungs on so it wasn’t nearly as low and as a result wasn’t half as difficult as I thought it’d be to get back upright.

It’s a bit like dropping a goldwing. (But the angle is a bit more) They don’t actually go over that for so it’s not as hard to get em up again.

So, an unexpected benefit of 'through the block' crash bungs.

(Beware of cheap imitations)
 
#4
Get younger, you lose about 10% of your strength every 10 years from the age of 30. I'm 60 now and I've noticed recently that stuff I picked up easily in my 30's and 40's I struggle with now. Just yesterday I had to get help to carry a kitchen worktop, something I did on my own for years previously.
Yes I am getting older too, 55, and yes I concur but it's not helping unless I go for a C90!
 
#6
I dropped mine without crash bungs and it was a full on power lift drive from the floor, with good form.

Add a few years and a heart attack and general lack of physical condition and I dropped it again.
And I’m like 'oh fluck, here we go...I wonder how this is going to pan out?'

But this time I had crash bungs on so it wasn’t nearly as low and as a result wasn’t half as difficult as I thought it’d be to get back upright.

It’s a bit like dropping a goldwing. (But the angle is a bit more) They don’t actually go over that for so it’s not as hard to get em up again.

So, an unexpected benefit of 'through the block' crash bungs.

(Beware of cheap imitations)
Ah I never realised the bungs meant the bike does not go so far over. Did you fit one on each side or four? Where did you purchase them I have seen them form 30 to 130 and that you have to change the water bottle as there is a rod that goes through the bike? I have also seen round ones and ones that are more oval in shape?
 

clumsy_geezer

Growing old, and fast
Site Sponsor
#8
Dropped mine quite a few times early on in my riding. (see my moniker...)
I'd have been around 60 at the time and managed to pick it up on my own. (I'm around 5ft 9 with an upside down body)

The secret, for me anyway, is fear of embarrassment.
There were lots of people around and I wanted to pick it up before any of them spotted me being a pratt.......

As for technique: Don't think about it, don't lift on the plastic bits and FFS don't let it fall over the other side when you do get it upright.

Could I do it now?
I wouldn't even attempt to stop it falling over once gravity takes hold, let alone pick it back up. (I've got a matching pair of Titanium knees, and I aint gonna risk them... They're part of my funeral plan)
 
#9
I am going rig something in the garage so if I get stuck I can hoist it up with a rig but I think I need to try , away firom a junction or car park as that’s where the only two I had occurred
Maybe carry a small jack to get it to a decent angle !
 

burridge01

Registered User
Site Sponsor
#10
I dropped the 12 doing a tight turn,landed on the crash bung(no damage to bike)which left it slightly raised.After a bit of swearing I bent the knees grabbed the handle bar and rear grab handle and pulled the thing upright(it's a bloody heavy bike)As i'm aging not sure how much longer I can/could do it but the bungs do help.
 

North Face

Registered User
#12
After humping things about for a living for many years I can concur that lifting is 20% strength and 80% technique. Like getting a bike on the main stand, I do mine with my left hand and right foot only by putting all my weight onto the stand, (that's why stands are the shape they are). I see a lot of people trying to pull the bike onto the stand with their right arm which takes a lot more effort.
 

North Face

Registered User
#13
The way folks recommend you lift a bike is flawed because when the bike gets vertical, you find yourself facing the wrong way and if you're not careful, the bike carries on and ends up laying on its other side! This is why they say to put the side stand down but it's still risky. I guess it may be the best way if you don't have much strength but if you're not used to it, it's still difficult. When I first got my VFR and the charging system was playing up, I had to bump start quite a lot. Since packing up work, I'm not sure I could do that any more and would prefer to rely on the kindness of passers-by to help.
 
#14
It’s gotta be about technique.
How else could you pick a bike up on one side and throw it down on the other if it wasn’t for shite technique?

Here’s a tip folks, when it starts to get upright, stop pushing like a twat.
You’d think given the amount of effort it takes, folk’d be glad to stop?
And don’t forget the closer to upright you get it, the easier it gets.

Once I’ve got mine to about 25-30° from upright I actually step in and rest the seat against my thigh and have a little rest half way. Keep a slight bend at your knee to protect it, think about what angle you’re going to put your foot (the toes should be in line with your knee.) and do not whatever you do - twist your knee by rotating your hips and leaving your foot where it is.
 
#15
There have been some really interesting ideas and views with this, I came across the below the other day on Youtube different to the sit down ass in push back this may work as an alternative. When I dropped my bike at a junction in the wet the slippery road surface meant as I pushed backwards having placed my ass against the seat, in a tucked squat position my feet just slid across the ground as I couldn't get any grip, so here's the alternative
 

FTM

Registered User
#17
I once picked up a GSXR400 like that after being knock off it by a doctor. Only for the throttle grip to come off in my hand and the bike fall over on its other side. I can still see the faces of the blokes in the builders van laughing their tits off.
 

North Face

Registered User
#18
I fell off in the snow in heavy traffic when I was about 18, 'couldn't get enough traction to pick the bike up again and nobody would get out of their car to help. Then a grey hackney cab comes driving up, on the white line between the two lines of traffic, registration "BSA1" and the guy get's out and helps me get upright again. Turns out it was Roger King who owned Kings Motorcycles in Birmingham :cool:
 
#20
I was talking about this to an ex teddy boy and he reckoned...

Take a wide stance
Put your toes just up the edge of each tyre.
Grab hold the andle bars (n prob rear shock)
And lean back..

He never did tell me what the f you do when the thing starts coming upright. Lol
 
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