Help no gears

dennis1

Registered User
#1
Out on my fl last week, suddenly no gears. The gear pedal had worked loose and gone slightly inboard of the splines up to the engine case. I managed to get it back in place and tightened. Out today and same again, this time even though ive got it back in place i can only get first and second gear and with some difficulty. Ideas please. Im thinking something bent in the gear box.
 

Pete/48

Registered User
Site Sponsor
#2
I would check the simple things first, i/e----Are you sure the gear lever is not slipping on the gear shaft, I know you say you have tightened the bolt on the leaver, but if in the past the lever has been loose on the shaft it could well have worn its internal spines and now won't close down enough to grip the shaft securely , Or if your really unlucky it may have worn the gearbox shaft,
Hope its something as simple as this,
 

Pete Cas

Registered User
Site Sponsor
#3
Is the bolt tight and the lever tight on the splines? If it's moved inboard at some point it's possible that the splines on the lever have been damaged through it being loose for a while, and are not properly engaging with the splines of the shaft. Hopefully the splines on the shaft are OK. Usually, if the bolt comes right out, the lever drops off.

(Beaten to it whilst typing... )
 

JZH

VFR Club Bodger
#4
The OEM steel levers are known to loosen internally over time, such that tightening the bolt no longer has any effect. You migth be able to machine the lever to allow further tightening, but it's a lot easier to buy a VFR800Fi alloy lever and fit that instead:

2016-05-23 17.18.17x.jpg

Ciao,

JZH
 

JZH

VFR Club Bodger
#5
The 800Fi lever is slightly shorter than the RC36 lever; I also found some others that are slightly longer:

2016-06-09 11.56.13x.jpg
I'd have to do some digging to find out which bikes they came from, though...

Ciao,

JZH
 

dennis1

Registered User
#6
so had a good look at the lever its almost smooth inside, splines worn. Not much better on the shaft. I've stuck it back on and stuck some chem metal where splines should be for now till I get another from evil bay. Also bled clutch which has helped. Thanks for replies.
 

Pete/48

Registered User
Site Sponsor
#7
If it were my bike, and I had absolutely got to use it before I could get a replacement, I would get a flat file, then file the gap in the lever (the one at right angles, adjacent to the main splined hole)-- making this gap bigger by a couple of mill will allow the bolt to close the lever tighter onto the shaft, as I very much doubt your chem metal will be of much use in this instance, (donno I could be wrong about the stuff, never used it myself,)
 

Pete/48

Registered User
Site Sponsor
#8
Another way ----- If the gap is now closed right up, (as I suspect it might be in your case) you could remove the lever from the bike, then hold it in a vice or similar, then run a hacksaw blade down the gap, once you have done that, get another hacksaw blade and also put this in the hacksaw along side the original one, (so you have (2) blades side by side), then run these down the gap again, that should make the gap plenty wide enough,
 

PAD

Registered User
Site Sponsor
#10
so had a good look at the lever its almost smooth inside, splines worn. Not much better on the shaft. I've stuck it back on and stuck some chem metal where splines should be for now till I get another from evil bay. Also bled clutch which has helped. Thanks for replies.
Not much better on the shaft? Are you sure they aren’t just clogged with the debris from the lever?

I hope that the chemical metal isn’t too good, or you might struggle to get the lever back off!
 

Pete Cas

Registered User
Site Sponsor
#11
One dodge that I read of, if the splines were indeed worn, was to first clean the splines. Fit the lever, but don't tighten the bolt. Then use some stationery pins (soft ones like those given away when you buy your poppy) pushing them into the gaps between the splines to take up slack, then tighten the bolt, and snip off any excess pin. How effective it is I don't know as I've never had to try it, but I can see how it could work. (I wouldn't use sewing pins as they tend to be hardened and you'd have to be careful when cutting off excess pin length.)
 

steve27bha

The skinny sassenach
#12
A development of the idea above is to drill a pair of holes along the splines through the lever and shaft interface, and insert nails to act as the splines.
Drill with the lever in its intended position but not clamped up too tight. You need to drill very slightly smaller than the nail diameter so the pinch bolt tightens the nails into place, then cut off the excess.
Place the holes at 120° from the pinch slot.
I've not had to do this so procede at your own risk!
Also check the pinch bolt. It should sit in a groove in the shaft to prevent it moving sideways (unlike yours as reported) with the head uppermost (so it will not fall out) so it needs an unthreaded section in that area.
 

PAD

Registered User
Site Sponsor
#13
That’s a good approach if the metals involved are the same or much the same. But a hardened steel shaft and alloy lever will lead to the drill bit taking the path of least resistance.
 

JZH

VFR Club Bodger
#14
That’s a good approach if the metals involved are the same or much the same. But a hardened steel shaft and alloy lever will lead to the drill bit taking the path of least resistance.
Fortunately, that is also the part that is worn (the lever). Still, can't see the attraction of saving that ugly POS welded steel lever when nicer alloy alternatives are a few clicks away...

Ciao,

JZH
 

FTM

Registered User
#15
Back in the day I've seen steel plns or needles hammered in the gap between lever and shaft. When the pinch bolt is tightened it should hold the lever firm.
 

PAD

Registered User
Site Sponsor
#16
Fortunately, that is also the part that is worn (the lever). Still, can't see the attraction of saving that ugly POS welded steel lever when nicer alloy alternatives are a few clicks away...

Ciao,

JZH
Maybe we’re talking at cross-porpoises? My interpretation of Steve’s suggestion is that the hole(s) should be half in the lever and half in the shaft, with the holes parallel to the axis of the shaft. In effect, the nail(s) act like a key. Thus my comment about different materials - the drill bit will always want to wander into the softer metal. Now, if it was done on a milling machine with a suitably hard end mill...:nut:

But I agree completely over the alloy vs steel lever - the steel item is an atrocious looking carbuncle of a thing. So if the splines on the shaft are ok, 100% - go for an alloy replacement.
 

JZH

VFR Club Bodger
#20
I've only seen a couple of these, but I think it's usually the steel lever that wears, rather than the shaft. Harder steel on the latter, I presume.

You might think that the alloy would wear even faster than the steel, but none of the ones I purchased when I was experimenting were worn at all. Maybe an engineer-type person could explain why!

Ciao,

JZH
 
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